Tech Blog

UA Tech Focuses on Adults Suffering from Sleep Insufficiency
Wednesday, April 26, 2017

University of Arizona faculty member, Michael Grandner, develops novel software platform and wearable to address sleep insufficiency in conjunction with University of Pennsylvania faculty member, Michael Perlis.

Professor Rychlik and Mohamad Moussa visit Tech Launch Arizona to provide insight into their novel technology.

Professor Rychlik and Mohamad Moussa visit Tech Launch Arizona to provide insight into their novel technology. Photo credit: Taylor Hudson/Tech Launch Arizona

Monday, March 27, 2017

Ph.D. student Mohamad Moussa and Professor Marek Rychlik in the University of Arizona Department of Mathematics, have developed an improved method for mitigating data loss due to faults in the storage medium (disk).

Monday, February 27, 2017

UA professor of ecology and evolutionary biology Michael Worobey, Ph.D., has invented a new, sensitive method for retrieving genetic material (RNA) from heavily damaged samples, which was published in Nature in 2016. The technology is now available for license.

Retro-reflector diagram. Image credit: Chetvorno
Friday, January 20, 2017

A retro-reflector is a device or surface that is capable of reflecting light back to its source with minimal scattering. UA’s Russell Chipman, Ph.D., and Karlton Crabtree, Ph.D., created a novel design for a retro-reflector that increases the reflection efficiency while reducing the complexity of the system.

Rats were exposed to room light and fitted with contact lenses, one shown here, that allowed the green spectrum wavelength to pass through the lenses. (Photo: Bob Demers/UANews)

Rats were exposed to room light and fitted with contact lenses, one shown here, that allowed the green spectrum wavelength to pass through the lenses. (Photo: Bob Demers/UANews)

Tuesday, November 22, 2016

The most common method of managing pain is the use of opioids like morphine, oxycodone, and fentanyl, all of which are highly addictive. Research has shown that therapeutic exposure to low-intensity green light can reverse chronic pain.

Cryptosporidium. Photo credit: Alae-eddine GATI (Own work) [GFDL (http://www.gnu.org/copyleft/fdl.html) or CC BY-SA 3.0 (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0)], via Wikimedia Commons
Monday, October 24, 2016

Cryptosporidium is a protozoan parasite that lives in the intestine and is a major cause of moderate-to-severe diarrhea in humans and livestock worldwide. Michael Riggs, DVM, PhD, DACVP, has developed monoclonal antibodies capable of detecting Cryptosporidium antigens.

An artist's rendition of the OSIRIS-REx spacecraft over asteroid Bennu. Image courtesy of NASA.
Monday, September 26, 2016

For the OSIRIS-REx asteroid sample return mission that the University of Arizona is leading, researchers developed the OSIRIS-REx Camera Suite (OCAMS). One of the cameras, PolyCam, has a novel roller screw designed to meet the accuracy, reliability, and power requirements that the mission demands.

Raymond K. Kostuk, Ph.D., exhibits the bench-top VHIS at work in his lab located in the University of Arizona’s Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering. Credit: Taylor Hudson/Tech Launch Arizona
Monday, August 22, 2016

Ovarian cancer accounts for about three percent of cancers among women, but results in the most deaths. Raymond K. Kostuk Ph.D. and Jennifer Barton Ph.D. have dedicated their recent research to an imaging method and device for detection and diagnosis of ovarian cancer. 

Douglas Loy, Ph.D., is a professor with appointments in both the College of Engineering and the College of Science at the University of Arizona. Loy’s research at UA has been focused on sol-gel science and materials, new materials and methods for advanced membranes, and environmentally responsive materials. (Photo credit: Taylor Hudson/Tech Launch Arizona)
Tuesday, July 26, 2016

Most sunscreens are made with potentially harmful chemicals. Professor Douglas Loy, Ph.D., and graduate assistant Robb Bagge have developed new bio-based particles for sun-blocking purposes. The resulting sunscreens provide an inexpensive, non-toxic alternative that absorbs UV radiation.

Dr. Christopher Walker (right), professor of astronomy at the University of Arizona’s Steward Observatory, inventor of the terahertz transistor. Photo credit: Taylor Hudson/Tech Launch Arizona.
Monday, June 27, 2016

Christopher Walker, Ph.D., a professor of astronomy at the University of Arizona’s Steward Observatory, has developed a new transistor design that could be used for safer high-resolution medical imaging as well as security and radar imaging, spectroscopy and ultra-fast data links.

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